pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Genghis Khan had a government with a code name “yassa” that had a standard of equality towards everybody. He prohibited stealing, defection of soldiers, wife stealing, and other rules which made everything safer. He gave full protection to everybody and had no favorites with anybody.  The Mongol Empire did not emphasize the importance of ethnicity and race in the administrative realm, instead, He believed that appointments and responsibilities should be given by talent and skills not by wealth. 
Mongols were highly tolerant of most religions, and typically sponsored several at the same time. At the time of Genghis Khan in the 13th century, virtually every religion had found converts, from Buddhism to Christianity and Islam. To avoid strife, Genghis Khan set up an institution that ensured complete religious freedom, though he himself was a shamanist. Under his administration, all religious leaders were exempt from taxation, and from public service. Mongol emperors were known for organizing competitions of religious debates among clerics, and these would draw large audiences.

pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

Genghis Khan had a government with a code name “yassa” that had a standard of equality towards everybody. He prohibited stealing, defection of soldiers, wife stealing, and other rules which made everything safer. He gave full protection to everybody and had no favorites with anybody.  The Mongol Empire did not emphasize the importance of ethnicity and race in the administrative realm, instead, He believed that appointments and responsibilities should be given by talent and skills not by wealth. 

Mongols were highly tolerant of most religions, and typically sponsored several at the same time. At the time of Genghis Khan in the 13th century, virtually every religion had found converts, from Buddhism to Christianity and Islam. To avoid strife, Genghis Khan set up an institution that ensured complete religious freedom, though he himself was a shamanist. Under his administration, all religious leaders were exempt from taxation, and from public service. Mongol emperors were known for organizing competitions of religious debates among clerics, and these would draw large audiences.

(via the-blood-of-a-warrior)

playstation:

Samurai Warriors 4

The famous hack-‘n’-slash series celebrates its 10th anniversary this year! Celebrate by decimating hundreds of enemies. No really, that’s a great way to celebrate in a video game. Watch the trailer.

kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.
A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.
Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.
That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.
HT: Kris Kanthak.

kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.

A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.

Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.

That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.

HT: Kris Kanthak.

(via 100proof)